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Five minutes with: Peter Dutton

British born Peter Dutton began his hairdressing career at the age of sixteen. After he moved to New Zealand in 2001 he spent six years hairdressing in the Auckland area before opening his own digs, Peter Dutton Hairdressing in Freemans Bay, Auckland.

How did you get into hairdressing?

While I was at school in the UK I did a week’s worth of work experience at a salon. From there I was offered weekend work – one thing led to another and soon after I began full-time hairdressing. I guess it was a good career start for a self expressing teenager.

What is your most memorable career moment?

Travelling around India for three weeks in 2005 conducting creative courses for L’Oreal was an amazing experience. As was being a judge for the L’Oreal Colour Trophy in Mumbai.

India is an amazing country and I made some lasting friendships whilst there. Also, having the opportunity to open my own salon is up there.

Do you prefer to cut or colour?

For me it’s all down to the cut. From my earliest beginnings in hairdressing I was fascinated by with shapes, lines, structure and the technical manipulation. I have always been influenced by the Vidal Sassoon principles of precision cutting.

After attending my first cutting courses at the Vidal Sassoon Academy in London in the late ’80s my passion for the cut was fuelled and focused.

Although the cut is very important to me, nothing compliments a well balanced cut more than a well placed colour – the perfect combo.

What should someone take into consideration before getting a new ‘do?

Lifestyle! There are always a few things to consider but I’ve found the best results are achieved when clients take into account their lifestyle.

If you’re the “wash and ready” type, an idea would be to use your natural texture and go for a length that falls into shape, apply suitable product and off you go.

Wash and ready hair doesn’t mean dull or boring and can still be dressed up for your glam evenings out.

How often should you use a hair treatment or masque at home?

Depending on the sensitivity or damage to the hair, once a week will improve the condition of your hair.

If your hair has been coloured, exposed to the sun or subjected to heated tools repeatedly it’s advisable to use a treatment every time you wash your hair. Condition, condition, condition.

Is it OK to wash your hair daily?

It’s preferable not to if you can get away with it. For those who must wash daily a quality shampoo and conditioner recommended by your stylist is a must. But remember, washing daily will effect the longevity of coloured hair.

Are heat-activated tools bad for the hair?

Everything in moderation. Over-use or incorrect use of heated tools can take their toll on the condition of your hair.

As a rule of thumb, always keep the tools moving through the hair, be conscious of reworking already heated areas.

Some tools provide “how to” DVDs which are well worth watching for correct technique.

Protective sprays and leave in moisturisers designed to use with heated tools can be worth investing in for the seriously addicted.

What are three key trends for summer 08/09?

1 Hair is shorter in length with longer layers creating rounder, softer fuller shapes for summer, moving away from slim, narrow square shapes.

2 Blondes with a gold accent – ranging from rusty rose gold’s to the palest honey shades.

3 Going with a natural finish – no more wet, sleek look. Natural, beautiful ruffled summer hair.

If you could choose to do the hair of any celebrity who would it be and why?

Agyness Deyn. Great face, great hair and a great look. She looks like the adventurous type, game for something new.

Hair Today: L’Oreal Colour Trophy

Penny Ainsley

Supreme Award Hairdresser of the Year, 2003

What salon do you work for?

My own salon, Ainsleys Hair Design. When I won the award I was working for Bettjemans.

What did winning the award mean for your career?

Career-wise it opened up huge opportunities to work with L’Oréal. I’m currently on the L’Oréal Professional Creative Team, which is a group of stylists selected from salons across New Zealand to help put together the latest looks and trends in hairdressing. The award also enabled me to set up my own salon.

What is the best thing about the L’Oréal Colour Trophy Awards?

Probably that everybody knows you overnight! The connections made simply by winning this award are phenomenal.

What do you love about hairdressing?

To be in the industry you have to be passionate. For me, it’s about people and about making them look beautiful inside and out. I love that aspect of hairdressing.

Terry Whaitiri

Young Colourist of the Year, 2003

What salon do you work for?

Servilles Mission Bay.

What did winning the award mean for your career?

Winning the award gave me recognition from my peers and within the industry.

It was also a really good boost to my self-esteem and confidence.

What is the best thing about the L’Oréal Colour Trophy Awards?

L’Oréal is one of the bigger, more prestigious competitions, so if you win, your name is really put out there.

What do you love about hairdressing?

I love the creative side of hairdressing; the ability to have a lot of fun with it and to make people feel and look amazing.

Grant Bettjeman

Supreme Award Hairdresser of the Year Runner-Up, 2004

What salon do you work for?

My own salon, Bettjemans.

What did winning the award mean for your career?

Being awarded runner-up was just like winning, really – my speech sounded as if I had anyway! Career-wise it’s great for your own profile and it’s a wonderful industry award.

What is the best thing about the L’Oréal Colour Trophy Awards?

Having your name in the press and being able to use the win as a branding exercise is fantastic. And when you’re putting clients’ hair in your hands, it’s important that they know you’re up there with the best. I also like the way it makes you be creative and current.

What do you love about hairdressing?

For me, the reason I’ve been in the industry for 30-plus years is I love being creative. But also for me, a big part of it is making people feel good. I love finding out what people are doing, what they think and what their dreams and aspirations are.

Jan Waite

Team Award, 2005

What salon do you work for?

My own salon, Jan Waite Hairdressing.

What did winning the award mean for your career?

It was a fantastic award for the salon to win. I used it as a marketing tool for my business, as the awards are advertised in a lot of publications and industry magazines, so our name was heavily publicised. Being part of a winning team also helped encourage the young ones in my salon to understand the formula that it is needed to create a Colour Trophy look.

I guess you can say it raised the standards.

What is the best thing about the L’Oréal Colour Trophy Awards?

In my mind, the L’Oréal Colour Trophy is the most prestigious award in the industry, so to win is just fantastic.

What do you love about hairdressing?

I love people and I love to make people feel amazing.

Jayne Thomas

Supreme Award Hairdresser of the Year, 2006

What salon do you work for?

Servilles Newmarket.

What did winning the award mean for your career?

I’ve been in the industry for more than 30 years and, for me, winning was the pinnacle of my career, and still is.

What is the best thing about the L’Oréal Colour Trophy Awards?

The awards are without doubt the best in our industry. I think L’Oréal is such a professional brand and the company presents the competition so well.

What do you love about hairdressing?

Hairdressing is my passion. My philosophy about hairdressing is I don’t feel as if it’s work and I feel very blessed for that. It’s a job that makes others feel good and the fact that I contribute to that is a big deal for me.