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Simple ways to embrace everyday mindfulness

Simple ways to embrace everyday mindfulness

Simple ways to embrace everyday mindfulness

When we talk about mindfulness, meditation is often the first thing to pop up. But being present doesn’t always mean closing your eyes and keeping still. It can be as simple as listening to the sounds around you or paying attention to what you eat.

Read on for the simple ways you can slow down and find peace.

Tune into your senses

A simple way to be present is to tune into your senses. You can do this from any place, be it at your desk or on a walk. Start by taking note of all the things you can hear, then smell, and so on until you’ve gone through all your senses. Our senses are powerful and are great tools for slowing down and being in the moment.

Eat mindfully

In our busy lives, we often distract ourselves when eating a meal. Mindful eating, the practice of paying attention to food, is all about focusing on the sensual awareness of good and the experience of eating.

It’s a common technique used for people who want to curb unhealthy eating habits. But this style of eating is another way to ground yourself in the present and ignore distractions. Try this by eating your food slowly and really noticing the tastes and sensations as you take each bite.

Notice your breathing

Going back to your breath is a great way to practice mindfulness. Because its something we do naturally, we usually don’t notice it. By paying attention to your breathing, it can take you out of your mind and into your body.

Name your feelings

In moments where you feel overwhelmed, it can be helpful to simply label your feelings. Try saying out loud or in your head “I am feeling ____.” You can even try to locate where in your body you notice the emotion, is it in your head, chest, stomach?

This practice helps separate your mind from your emotions, says Mitch Abblett from Mindful. “We can create distance between ourselves and our experience that allows us to choose how to respond to challenges.”

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