Fitness

The research-backed benefits of yoga

This Saturday, yogis all around the world are grabbing their mats and practicing their poses to celebrate World Yoga Day. Turns out there’s more to down dog that you might think. Read on to learn the research-backed benefits of yoga. 

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Why should you monitor your heart rate when exercising?

With the rise in wearable technology, tracking your heart rate has become a given when exercising. When you’re pounding the […]

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10 Reasons to Take Up Pilates

We all know that Pilates is great for core strength and fitness, but did you know it can also reverse the signs of ageing, and help balance hormone levels?

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New workouts to try in 2022

Switch up your exercise routine with this year’s trendiest workouts.

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Jennifer Lopez has Shared Part of her Workout Routine With her Fans

If you’ve ever wondered how Jennifer Lopez stays in shape, you’re in luck as the actress has shared part of […]

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One Run a Week Could Keep the Doctor Away

A new study has found that any amount of running reduces the risk of early death.

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High Intensity Interval Training Boosts Memory According to New Study

There’s now a number of reasons why HIIT should be your exercise of choice.

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Michelle Obama Admits She Always Feels Better After a Workout

Going to the gym isn’t always fun, but once you’ve finished your workout, you always feel better according to former First Lady, Michelle Obama.

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Winter fitness goals: 9 reasons to get moving this week

We get it – it’s wet, wild and windy out there. But here are nine reasons you should get moving this week and give your body and mind a winter pick-me-up.

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The best ways to burn the most calories in an hour

Calories burned per hour is a good measure of how intense a particular exercise is. So, what are some of the best ways to burn the most calories in an hour?

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I Tried… Hula-Hoop Fitness

Hula hooping has been around for decades. But while it was simply a cool party trick in the 1950s, it’s recently emerged as a new fitness fad. Our columnist thinks she’ll be a natural…

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I tried… HIIPA

The craze for HIIPA has health & exercise professionals talking – but can this trend towards incidental exercise ever be as good as a dedicated work-out? Our columnist Cat Rodie gives it a go to find out.

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Move your butt to beat bowel cancer

Commit to moving your butt, and beat bowel cancer!

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Getting fit in your 40s, 50s just as beneficial as doing it in your teens

It’s truly never too late to begin exercising. New research suggests that  increasing activity in your 40s and 50s lowers risk […]

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Take the stairs – your heart will thank you

Climbing stairs for a few minutes at short intervals throughout the day can boost heart health – new study. It […]

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You’re never too old to start lifting weights

Older people benefit hugely from resistance exercises, says new research. But, where do you start? A study by researchers at the […]

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Research shows resistance training is good for the heart – and it doesn’t take much

Lifting weights – or resistance training – for less than an hour a week may reduce your risk for a […]

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How many calories do you burn? It depends on time of day

Researchers have made the surprising discovery that the number of calories people burn while at rest changes with the time […]

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5 fitness trends to look out for in 2019

5 health and fitness trends to watch as we head into 2019. In 2018, we saw the resurgence of boxing, […]

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‘Fitness Snacking’ is your new bite at a healthier life

Don’t get too excited, snack lovers – this fitness regime doesn’t involve eating while working out. But it does promise a fitness […]

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Why being a couch potato comes so naturally

We are designed to be attracted to lazy behaviour – that couch potato life – so just how do we […]

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Summer bodies are made in spring – here’s how

Envious of those beautiful summer bodies – don’t be? Using tips from the pros, you can get fit effortlessly, and […]

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Warning over global lack of exercise – particular among women

More than a quarter of the world’s people are not doing enough exercise – particularly women. A new World Health […]

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Heard it through the treadmill: why music helps you work out

Playing favourite sounds makes you feel less tired and the workout goes quicker. Bumping your playlist when you’re on the […]

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Studies show that fitness or exercise can curb anxiety in patients dealing with a chronic illness such as heart and circulatory problems, fibromyalgia, arthritis, mental health problems, cancer, and breathing disorders.

The study demonstrates that aerobic exercise has profound effects on brain chemistry and physiology. The behavioural effects of a single exercise “intervention” include improved executive function, enhanced mood and decreased stress levels. The results are a big step toward understanding how the positive impact of exercise may accrue over time to cause long-lasting changes in the brain.

“Exercise interventions are currently being used to help address everything from cognitive impairments in normal ageing, minimal cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease to motor deficits in Parkinson’s disease and mood states in depression,” Suzuki says.

So if you’re serious about keeping your mind healthy and active, it’s worth moving your body too.

Research conducted by Roy Morgan showed that almost three in four New Zealanders doesn’t eat the recommended daily amount of fruits and vegetables. Only around one in three Kiwi women and one in five men eat three or more serves of vegetables and two or more serves of fruit each day, the amount recommended by the New Zealand Ministry of Health.