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World’s Most Unusual Lakes

Fancy swimming with stingless jellyfish, or paddling in pink water? You can at these unusual lakes around the world.

World’s Most Unusual Lakes

Jellyfish Lake, Palau

Located in Palau, an archipelago in Micronesia, Jellyfish Lake full of hundreds of thousands of stingless golden jellyfish. Because of the isolation from the ocean and low population of predators, jellyfish lost their need to sting, which means you can comfortably swim with these incredible creatures as they drift around the lake.

Five Flower Lake, China

Five Flower Lake, China

This jaw-dropping body of water is one of 108 multi-coloured lakes in Sichuan’s Jiuzhaigou National Park, Crystal clear, the shallow lake glistens like an opal, its hues changing depending on your vantage point. Visit in spring, when cherry blossom trees add an extra splash of colour.

Yucatan Cave Lake, Mexico

Yucatan Cave Lake, Mexico

Legend has it that this cave was gifted to the region by a Mayan god. Whether you believe the myth or not, you’ll want to make a pilgrimage to this hidden subterranean lake, its limestone terraces formed more than two million years ago. Overhung with vines and foliage, it’s a magical place to visit.

Boiling Lake, Dominica

Boiling Lake, Dominica

A beautiful Caribbean island popular for its diving and hiking, Dominica is hot – literally. The slip of land is home to Boiling Lake – a whirlpool at the centre of the lake is actually the only part that boils, but water by the shore can reach 70 degrees Celsius, with the heat due to the region’s volcanic activity.

Pink Lake, Australia

Pink Lake, Australia

A salt lake in Western Australia, Pink Lake does not have its rosy hue year round – the water changes colour as a result of the green algae living here, as well as a high concentration of brine prawn. It’s an important habitat for birds, with a significant number of hooded plovers calling the region home.

Lake Baikal, Russia

Lake Baikal, Russia

An ancient rift lake, considered the deepest of its kind in the world, Baikal stores methane in the form of hydrates on its murky bottom. Its location in Siberia means that it freezes over the winter months, and when it melts, the methane causes huge circles to appear on the ice – some are so large you can’t actually see them from the ground, only from space.

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