The symbolism behind the Queen’s funeral wreath

The coffin of Britain's Queen Elizabeth is carried into the Westminster Abbey on the day of her state funeral and burial, in London, Britain, September 19, 2022.  REUTERS/Hannah McKay/Pool     TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
The coffin of Britain's Queen Elizabeth is carried into the Westminster Abbey on the day of her state funeral and burial, in London, Britain, September 19, 2022. REUTERS/Hannah McKay/Pool TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

The Queen will be fondly remembered for her love of bright colour, as demonstrated by her vibrant clothing, especially in her later years. It’s therefore fitting that she had a wreath of bright blossoms adorn her coffin for her funeral. 

Nestled among lush green foliage were roses, hydrangea, dahlias and more in blush pinks, burgundies and hints of gold.

The flowers and plants were taken from royal properties, cut from the gardens of Buckingham Palace, Clarence House and Highgrove House at King Charles III’s request.

While traditionally royal funeral wreaths feature white flowers with green tones, they can also be chosen to reflect a flag, as was the case here where the blooms complemented the colours of the Royal Standard flag over the Queen’s coffin.

The foliage chosen had symbolic meaning – rosemary for remembrance, English oak for strength and strength of love, and myrtle, the ancient symbol of a happy marriage.

The myrtle was cut from a plant that had been grown from a sprig of myrtle that was in the Queen’s own wedding bouquet.

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