Photojournalists selling their work to raise money for refugees

EMILIO MORENATTI/AP: Girls from the remote village of Ghumaipayan Mahnow in northern Afghanistan, near the border with Tajikistan, watch as U.N. workers unload ballot boxes from a helicopter in preparation for the first elections in the country's history. Oct. 4, 2004.
EMILIO MORENATTI/AP: Girls from the remote village of Ghumaipayan Mahnow in northern Afghanistan, near the border with Tajikistan, watch as U.N. workers unload ballot boxes from a helicopter in preparation for the first elections in the country's history. Oct. 4, 2004.
This is how you can help refugees, one print at a time.

Many people are often at a loss at what it is they can do to really enact change in the world. Do you donate to charity? Join a protest movement? Sit by and do nothing? These are the questions that often pass through people’s minds, yet very little tangible change actually happens to improve the welfare of others in need.

Photojournalists in particular face what to many is an ethical hardship. Documenting atrocities, photojournalists are often in the midst of serious political, cultural and emotional turmoil and are, more often than not, contractually obliged to not interfere.

Whilst many will argue that the role of a photojournalist is to create awareness, spread a message of solidarity and arm people with the emotional drive to help, others view their role as passive in the face of terror.

Eight photojournalists, who have spent their professional lives documenting the often undocumented, are using their work to hopefully change the world for the better.

In collaboration with Red Acoge, a nongovernmental organisation consisting of 18 different charity groups, each photographer is attempting to teach the world about the refugee crisis and raise money to help the cause of the world’s displaced.

Working with organisations like Associated Press and Reuters, these journalists are selling their prints for 60 euros.

The images are being exhibited at the Zoom Edition Gallery in Madrid until Nov. 20 and can be found online on the Red Acoge website until Jan 15, 2016.

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