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Gucci heirs say House of Gucci portrays family as ‘thugs’

The heirs of Aldo Gucci, the man who transformed the Florentine label into a global phenomenon, are not happy at the way their family is portrayed in Ridley Scott’s House of Gucci film, which stars Lady Gaga, Adam Driver and Al Pacino.

The film, which opened last week in cinemas worldwide, centres on the murder of family scion Maurizio Gucci, who was gunned down in 1995 in the hall of his elegant Milan office by a hitman hired by his estranged wife, Patrizia Reggiani.

Jeremy Irons, who plays patriarch Rodolfo Gucci, said in an interview with Reuters this month the story was irresistible, calling it “bold, and brazen and blingy, Italian”.

The descendants of Aldo Gucci, son of company founder Guccio Gucci, begged to disagree.

“Despite the claim that the work seeks to tell the ‘true story’ of the family… the film conveys a narrative that is anything but accurate,” they said in a statement.

“The film’s production did not bother to consult the heirs before describing Aldo Gucci – president of the company for 30 years – and the members of the Gucci family as thugs who were ignorant and insensitive to the world around them.

“This is extremely painful from a human point of view and an insult to the legacy on which the brand is built today.”

FILE PHOTO: Cast member Lady Gaga poses for a photo as she arrives at the Italian Premiere of the film ‘House of Gucci’ at the Space Cinema Odeon in Milan, Italy, November 13, 2021. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo/File Photo

The family took particular issue with what they said was the film’s representation of Reggiani, played by Lady Gaga, “as a victim trying to survive in a masculine and chauvinistic corporate culture”.

“This could not be further from the truth. In the 70 years of history in which Gucci was a family business, it was always inclusive. Indeed, precisely in the 1980s – the historical context in which the film is set – there were several women in top positions, and not only family members.”

The family, which no longer has any relationship with the Gucci brand, now part of French luxury giant Kering, said it reserved the right “to take any action necessary to protect the name, image and dignity of themselves and their loved ones”.

Reuters

Virgil Abloh honoured in his final fashion collection show in Miami

Louis Vuitton honoured Virgil Abloh at his last fashion collection show in Miami on Tuesday, just days after his sudden death prompted an outpouring of tributes for the industry’s most high-profile black designer.

Drones formed Abloh’s initials and spelled out the words “Virgil was here” in the sky outside Miami’s Marine Stadium where the memorial event was held. There was also a giant statue of Abloh.

Chicago-based rapper Scott “Kid Cudi” Mescudi walked the runway before a live audience that included streetwear designer Don Crawley, known as Don C, Kim Kardashian and rapper ASAP Ferg, according to Instagram posts.

As the show began, roughly 16,000 viewers tuned in to watch on YouTube.

Models were clad in Vuitton jerseys, while others wore black top hats, bright red jumpsuits and blue suits. Female models carried blue and pink lockbox purses, while the men sported grey duffle bags.

Abloh, the American-born son of Ghanaian immigrants, died Sunday at age 41 following a private battle with cancer. LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton decided to move ahead with a catwalk show that had been in the works, transforming it into a tribute to Abloh.

Kendall Reynolds, chief executive of Kendall Miles Designs, said in an interview before the show that Abloh had inspired her to start the luxury brand of Italian handcrafted products.

“His indelible mark on the disruption of traditional European fashion houses will be a legacy that all young designers, like myself, can learn from,” she said.

The 45-minute livestream of the show closed with an eruption of fireworks and a recording of Abloh’s voice.

“There’s no limit,” said Abloh in the recording. “Life is so short that you can’t waste even a day subscribing to what someone thinks you can do versus knowing what you can do.”

Reuters