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6 Beautiful Neutral Interiors to Evoke a Sense of Calm

Neutral interiors are far from boring. With a muted colour palette and natural materials a neutral interior provides a calm and relaxing environment.

BERNIE’S BEACH by Sally Caroline (Photography Shannon McGrath)

When you want to create a calm and relaxing space, with great resale value, it’s hard to beat a neutral interior.

Far from being dull and boring, neutral interiors use soothing colours and textures to create a comforting space. Think earthy tones such as beige, grey and greige, and natural materials like linen, timber, rattan, wool and ceramics.

B&B RESIDENCE by Hogg&Lamb (Photography Christopher Frederick Jones)

The B&B Residence explores minimalism with a restrained material and colour palette including walls painted in Dulux ‘Whisper White’, Solid French oak floorboards, Corian benchtop and sink in ‘Glacier White’ and Caesarstone Fresh Concrete island benchtop.

SAGE HOUSE by Carole Whiting Interiors and Design (Photography JACK SHELTON)

Superbianco Oak floors by Admonter form a soft, neutral foundation throughout Sage House that perfectly compliment the organic form of Doug Johnson’s Woven Pendant over the dining table and the breezy sheer curtains.

HILL HOUSE by Decus Interiors (Photography Anson Smart)

A neutral palette for the bathroom has moved beyond plain white tiles. Neutrals are more about a muted and natural colour and textures that create a calming space. Think soft natural light through skylights, warm mood lighting, natural stone and timber, and soft cotton.

WATTLE HOUSE by GOLDEN (Photography Sharyn Cairns)

The colour range for a neutral room extends far beyond natural white and wood. It’s a good idea to include a hint of colour, or a small bite of black or a dark colour to provide some contrast and tone as show in the Wattle House.

GEORGINA by Templeton Architecture (Photography Sharyn Cairns)

Subtle and comforting is the aim for neutral interiors, and this is achieved not only with the colours used but also the texture. Texture provides warmth, comfort and movement which is why it is so important in a neutral space. As well as soft furnishings, you can add texture to walls with a wallpaper, special wall paint or panelling.

4 renovation inspiration ideas for your bathroom

When planning a bathroom renovation, details are key. Here are some tips and trends to get the most out of your space.

EDSALL STREET by RITZ&GHOUGASSIAN. RITZGHOUGASSIAN.com. Photography: Tom Blachford.

It’s all about the grout

No-one likes to clean the bathroom, but everyone loves a clean bathroom – that’s were epoxy grout comes in. Made from epoxy resins, this grout is water-resistant and almost completely resistant to stains, which makes it much easier to clean than the regular grout. It is more expensive than regular grout, and harder to install, but for long-term convenience it’s definitely worth looking in to.

Not all grout is made equal. It now comes in every colour imaginable, and varying thickness, so put some thought into the grout you select because it can make or break your design.

OAK TREE HOUSE by Susi Leeton Architects. www.susileeton.com.au/project/tree-house. Photography: Peter Bennett.

Curve appeal

HDP RESIDENCE by Genesin Studio. www.genesin.com.au. Photography: Jonathan VDK.

BRIGHTON RESIDENCE by GOLDEN. designbygolden.com.au. Photography: Sharyn Cairns.

When it comes to contemporary design we are seeing more and more curves throughout the whole house, and the bathroom is no different. As well as curved shower screens, there’s also curved mirrors, walls and tiles featuring in new bathrooms. Curves add a softness to design.

Tile Mania

SAR RESIDENCE by Mim Design. www.mimdesign.com.au. Photography: Sean Fennessy.

TREE HOUSE by Madeleine Blanchfield Architects. www.madeleineblanchfield.com. Photography: Anson Smart.

Picking bathroom tiles is a huge challenge today as the choice is endless. Topping the trends (well today anyway) are subways, kit kat tiles and terrazzo. Or if the budget allows, a dizzying choice of marble. Tiles used to just be about functionality, but now they make a huge design statement. And it’s not just the choice of tile you need to make, but how you lay them too. Vertically laid subways are popular, as is a herringbone style pattern.

Let there be light

CLOUD HOUSE by Akin Atelier. www.akinatelier.com. Photography: Murray Fredericks.

With privacy and natural light being two key considerations for the bathroom, skylights are becoming an increasingly popular choice. While fixed skylights have been used in the bathroom for years, they can have a fairly big downside of getting mouldy over time if ventilation is limited. The new electric and solar skylights are openable with a remote control so you can have light and ventilation. Some remote skylights also have a built-in rain sensor and insect screens to keep out the mosquitoes.

WOOLLAHRA HOUSE by Nobbs Radford Architects. nobbsradford.com.au. Photography: Murray Fredericks.