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126 years of Suffrage: The women continuing the fight for gender equality

Despite having three female Prime Ministers, New Zealand celebrates 126 years of Suffrage knowing there is a long road ahead to fully address women's rights and gender equality. REUTERS

126 years of Suffrage: The women continuing the fight for gender equality

New Zealand is no longer the world leader in gender equality. So, 126 years on from becoming the first country to give women the right to vote, MiNDFOOD speaks to the women leading by their own examples.

126 years of Suffrage: The women continuing the fight for gender equality

In 1893, New Zealand became the first country in the world to give all women the right to vote.

Since then, the country has had three female Prime Ministers, and in 2001, was the first nation where women occupied all the top roles in government at the same time.

However, once a world leader in gender equality, New Zealand has slipped to ninth place.

MiNDFOOD speaks to four different women about how they’ve forged their own individual path in a male-dominated world, but in doing so, how they’ve helped the collective fight for gender equality in the process.

The enduring inspiration of Black Fern Fiao’o Fa’amausili

After many years of service to women's rugby in New Zealand, including captaining her country to World Cup glory, Fiao'o Fa'amausilii continues to inspire future generations of young Kiwi girls. KRISTIAN FRIRES

After many years of service to women’s rugby in New Zealand, including captaining her country to World Cup glory, Fiao’o Fa’amausilii continues to inspire future generations of young Kiwi girls. KRISTIAN FRIRES

Rugby player by day, police detective by night, Fiao’o Fa’amausili is known for putting her body on the line in more ways than one – inspiring future generations and protecting her community at the same time.

How Vanisa Dhiru is shaping a gender-equal future

It concerns Vanisa Dhiru that New Zealand, which once led the world in gender equality, has slipped into ninth place, saying the government has no action plan for women or for dealing with serious issues such as domestic violence, homelessness and poverty. KRISTIAN FRIRES

It concerns Vanisa Dhiru that New Zealand, which once led the world in gender equality, has slipped into ninth place, saying the government has no action plan for women or for dealing with serious issues such as domestic violence, homelessness and poverty. KRISTIAN FRIRES

When New Zealand became the first country to give women the vote in 1893, our antipodean nation was way ahead of its time. But, says equality activist Vanisa Dhiru, while we have plenty to be proud of, now is not the time to be resting on our laurels as gender inequality still exists.

Marama Mullen-Tamati’s triumph over HIV stigma

Marama Mullen-Tamati first decided to speak up in 2005 and has since made a huge impact in her community and around the world. KRISTIAN FRIRES

Marama Mullen-Tamati first decided to speak up in 2005 and has since made a huge impact in her community and around the world. KRISTIAN FRIRES

When a revolutionary drug turned her diagnosis from death sentence to manageable condition, Marama Mullen-Tamati found the motivation to affect change. She has since become a proud advocate for indigenous people, women, and those living with HIV.

How Kathleen Liberty eased trauma in Christchurch

Kathleen Liberty has helped schools implement creative, research-driven strategies to improve the wellbeing of young students suffering trauma as a result of the Canterbury earthquakes. KRISTIAN FRIRES

Kathleen Liberty has helped schools implement creative, research-driven strategies to improve the wellbeing of young students suffering trauma as a result of the Canterbury earthquakes. KRISTIAN FRIRES

Kathleen Liberty has helped schools implement creative, research-driven strategies to improve the wellbeing of young students suffering trauma as a result of the Canterbury earthquakes. And the results have been life-changing.

Thomasin McKenzie: Poised for Hollywood stardom

Thomasin McKenzie

New Zealand has long punched above its weight in Hollywood. Now, a Wellington schoolgirl, Thomasin McKenzie, with acting in her blood is set to join her compatriots in the limelight. GETTY

While no newcomer to acting, 18-year-old Thomasin McKenzie is quickly finding her feet in Hollywood. Acclaimed director Debra Granik’s latest film, Leave No Trace, was her big break on the silver screen. Her performance was much-lauded by critics and audiences around the globe, and more recently, McKenzie starred in fellow Kiwi’s World War II satire, Jojo Rabbit

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