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Oily fish helps halve arthritis risk

Including one portion of oily fish in your weekly meals may halve your risk of rheumatoid arthritis.

Oily fish helps halve arthritis risk

Salmon, mackerel, tuna are already widely regarded for their high levels of omega-3 fatty acids, beneficial to our overall health and wellbeing.

But a new study published this week in the journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, has found new evidence to entice us to consume more of our favourite fish.

The findings, which looked at more than 30,000 Swedish women across a decade, showed that those who consistently consumed any type of fish on a weekly basis cut their risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis by almost a third.

When the fish consumed was of the oily variety the risk was halved. This was also the case for woman who consumed any type of fish at least four times per week.

The results concur with the already established dietary advice given to regularly consume oily fish in our weekly meals and the rise in  boost this intake of omega-3’s.

While the study did not look into fish-oil supplements specifically, experts believe these have similar benefits.

Omega-3 is believed to help protect the body’s vital organs like the brain and the heart. It also appears to have good anti-inflammatory properties researchers said, which would explain why it helps to protect against arthritis.

Facts about oily fish:

  • A healthy, balanced diet should include at last two portions of fish a week. A portion being roughly 150g.
  • Types of oily fish include mackerel, salmon, sardines, trout, tuna and herring
  • Some shellfish and other types of fish may contain omega-3 but this is nowhere near as much as found in oily fish.
  • If you are pregnant or trying to conceive caution should be taken as fish can contain low levels of metals and pollutants that can build up in the body and be harmful. Always consult with your doctor or medical professional.
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